Articles Tagged with Water Supply Connectors

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Has your plumbing gone awry? Do any of your home appliances use water supply lines from EZ- FLO International, Inc.? Well, that may not be just a coincidence. According to a number of consumers, EZ-FLO water supply lines—the flexible tubing that is either covered with braided stainless steel or brass, or non-braided plastic, used to supply water to faucets, dishwashers, toilets, ice makers and other household fixtures—have been at the center of leaks around the country­­. These water supply lines often look like this:

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Considering the number of different places EZ-FLO water supply lines can be located throughout our homes, this is important information for any consumer! Comments for dishwasher supply lines include:

 

It has only been installed for 5 months and already the water line is leaking just before the connector. It was a slow drip and ruined our wood floors.

All 6 water supply lines that came leaked and had to be replaced by new ones bought at [L]owes, products were cheap but are not I got what I paid for, I wish I could return just the water lines but I don’t think amazon will allow me to do that. Don’t buy this product unless you only need the power cord.

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We here at the blog have spent a lot of time recently on water heaters, a major purchase that can leave consumers with a serious headache. But there is one thing far worse than a non-working water heater – a water heater that leaks, puddles and floods. In fact, any water leak, whether from a toilet, dishwasher or sink, is a homeowner’s worst nightmare – whether a small leak that goes unnoticed or a major component failure that causes thousands of dollars in damage to your floors, walls and carpets, water damage is a scary thing. But the culprit may not be your water heater, dishwasher or washing machine. The problem may be a simple piece that often goes unnoticed – defective braided stainless steel water supply connectors manufactured by Watts. According to various internet complaints, Watts supply lines suffer from a hidden problem that causes them to leak and, on occasion, burst, potentially causing thousands of dollars of damage in the process.

Water supply connectors are an important part of any home appliance that depends on water – water heaters, dishwashers, faucets, toilets, refrigerators, ice makers and washing machines all use them. Water supply connectors help get water from your home’s water lines to the appliance, hopefully without leaking in the process. More expensive than traditional copper connectors, braided stainless steel supply connectors like those offered by Watts are still expected to offer the same functionality and reliability in a more flexible product that fits easily into any space. Watts braided stainless steel water supply connectors are made from an extruded core of PVC tubing. The core is then over-braided with polyester yarn and another layer of PVC material, and a final layer of stainless steel braiding covers the entire product to provide a finished look and, supposedly, protection against leaks. The supply lines connect to the appliances using fittings attached to the ends of the lines.

Although Watts touts their products’ reliability and “protection from vibration and bursting under extreme pressure surges,” research indicates that their stainless steel water supply line connectors suffer from a variety of issues. Some users believe that the inner lining is not well-manufactured and can harden, crack and deteriorate as it’s exposed to your home’s water. As the internal PVC tubing hardens, it begins to crack and water begins to seep out through the braided stainless steel exterior. Water heater supply connectors are particularly susceptible to these problems – the interior lining seems unable to handle the intense temperatures, causing the lining to fail and water to leak from around the connectors.

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When Watts supply connectors fail just behind the fitting have witnessed Watts braided stainless steel connectors fail just behind the fitting, a failure that allows large quantities of water to leak at a much faster clip and causes even greater damage to your home.

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Supply connectors may be inexpensive relative to the cost of your appliance, but a failed connector may cost you thousands of dollars in damage all the same. Continue reading