Articles Tagged with Cars

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If you own a GMC or Chevrolet vehicle, you may have noticed that the air conditioning is not…well…working. You are not alone, as a number of consumers have complained that their GMC and Chevrolet vehicles pumped out only hot air. Owners of the following vehicles have all been subject to this hot air problem:

  • 2015 Cadillac Escalade Models
  • 2014-2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
  • 2015 Chevrolet Suburban
  • 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe
  • 2014-2015 GMC Sierra 1500
  • 2015 GMC Yukon Models

Owners of GMC, Cadillac and Chevy trucks whose AC systems are no longer cooling and have taken their vehicles to a mechanic or dealership have all been told the same thing—there is a cracked refrigerant hose leaking Freon from the compressor to the condenser. If the A/C line cracks, it could spray oil and refrigerant onto the A/C compressor, making the source of the leak hard to identify.

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Pictured: a crack in the compressor to condenser line

As it turns out, the AC system in Escalade, Silverado, Sierra, Yukon, Suburban, and Tahoe trucks stops working and ceases blowing cold air because of a defective bracket design affecting the A/C compressor and condenser line. The refrigerant hose is the “high pressure side” hose and sees about 350 psi pressure when the A/C is running. If the hose is not properly restrained—as is the case with the affected vehicles—one of the crimped metal fittings on the hose end may eventually start leaking due to the constant flexing of the hose in that location. Continue reading

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Volkswagen has recently come under serious fire for allegedly fraudulently concealing the true emissions of pollutants in certain of its Volkswagen, Porsche, and Audi diesel vehicles.  An announcement by Volkswagen this week is even more troubling for the company and also for those who own Volkswagen and Audi vehicles.  On Tuesday, Volkswagen announced that an internal investigation revealed what it titled “inconsistencies” in both carbon dioxide emissions and fuel economy of an additional 800,000 vehicles, most of which were sold in North America.  The Volkswagen internal investigation indicated the “inconsistencies” may lower fuel economy of certain vehicles up to 15 percent.

Details have yet to be revealed to the Environmental Protection Agency, which regulates emissions standards and sets the requirements for fuel economy measurements.  Consumers, too, are left in the dark while Volkswagen continues to not fully disclose this important information.

What Do We know and Which Vehicles Are Affected?  Continue reading

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Less than 10 years ago, the subprime mortgage lending crisis sent the economy into a tailspin.  Now, a new predatory lending practice has come to the forefront of financial and consumer concerns and has many of the same issues and risks as the mortgage crisis—used car loans at exorbitant rates to consumers with credit scores of 640 or below, also known as subprime auto loans.

There is a proliferation of used automobile dealerships advertising “No credit? Bad credit? No problem!” in an attempt to entice consumers who may not otherwise qualify for, and may not be able to afford, a used car loan.  These dealerships target potential purchasers with credit scores of 640 and below.  In exchange for offering credit to higher risk consumers, the banks financing these loans charge very high interest rates in comparison to those offered to potential purchasers with more favorable credit scores.  Occasionally, dealerships fabricate work history or income to ensure that a consumer qualifies for a loan.  In other circumstances, the dealerships and banks offer loans to consumers they should know do not have the ability to pay back.  In many cases, providing these high interest loans simply sets up car purchasers for failure with monthly payments they are realistically unable to afford.

Owners of vehicles financed through subprime auto loans do their best to make their payments, but often, unfortunately, the high interest rate combined with the large monthly payments lead to an inability to pay.  In some cases, after missed payments, the bank repossesses the vehicles. In other cases, even if the payment is a mere few days late, the bank utilizes remote starter interrupters that render the vehicles unable to start until the balance owed is paid.  This leaves consumers with no way to transport themselves and their families, even in the event of an emergency, or to travel to and from work.  Unfortunately, this often leads to even greater financial woes.

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